Aug 162015
 

 

Over the last few weeks and even as I sit here writing this today, change and the realisation that I might  be frightened of change has been staring me right in the face. Even when I’m not looking for it, it keeps on popping up- in blogs posts, in articles on the internet, in my yoga practice, everywhere. Actually, I tell a lie, it hasn’t really been following me around- I’ve been open to accepting it into my life a lot more. This has highlighted where my limitations are- it’s incredibly uncomfortable, but I feel like I’m growing (such a beautiful feeling!) As much as we want to hold onto things around us and certain situations, the world around us and therefore our worlds are in constant, gentle flux.

When you’re ill with something like CFS for so long, there are moments when you’re going to want to play it safe (as in, pretty much most of the time). Who would want to go through relapse and the agony of starting at square one again, right? It’s embarrassing, uncomfortable and it feels like there’s now way out. You’re completely stuck and you’re pushed to the very limits of what you can handle and what you can’t…

…at least that’s what I thought for a while before I hopped on board the change wagon. Once you’re on, it becomes pretty impossible to get off.

This week, I’ve gone gluten-free and ramped up my yoga practice (I seem to have accidentally fallen in love with it, even though I wasn’t particularly mad on it before) Next week, more of the same, more reading, more catching up with friends after being a slight hermit (I blame Australian winters!) and less playing it small.

Would it really be so bad if you bought an audiobook that could change you life and committed to listening to it, instead of just buying it and putting it on the back-burner like you did last time? What’s the worst that could happen? You don’t like what they have to say and switch it off. Nobody got hurt, you saved face and at least you took the first step and tried.

Maybe you want to ditch the coffee and try a green smoothie? Honestly, it’s a completely no-brainer. You don’t have to like it, but you just might. They look disgusting, but they taste pretty flippin’ good, let me tell you.

No marathon running, no switching to a vegan diet overnight- just play it softly. Shift softly. The reality is, you can think about change until you’re blue in the face, but at the end of the day, you’ll still be where you are unless to make the change.

That’s all there is to it. Just try. Be courageous.

(These suggestions probably sound really patronising, but honestly, there was a time in my life when I was so scared of change and of doing something differently, of thinking about things a different way, that I became really, really stuck. Changing my diet or choosing to read different books were terrifying to me at the time. I would hate for the same thing to happen to you.)

Ask someone for help if you’re unsure. They’ll cheer you on as much as they can, with every fiber of their being, trust me. Ask me for help if you’re a bit lost and absolutely friggin’ petrified.  I’ve got you. We’ve got you. You’ve got you.

I just want to leave you with this picture below, which really got me choked a few days ago.

If you want to change, you have to come unstuck.

change picture

Picture and design by the beautiful freshbysian.com

What change can you make today?

Love and evolving,

Katie     xxx

Jul 152015
 

I’ve never considered myself to be a dishonest person. I’ve never told lies, and I don’t make a habit of it. When you look at the concept of honesty really closely, you’ll see that for most people, it means not being dishonest with other people. You don’t want to upset or disappoint someone else, you want to cover up for the fact that you don’t want to do something, you make over-elaborate excuses. Everyone does it and society, unfortunately, is full of it.

But have you ever stopped and thought about how honest you’re being with yourself? As ‘woo-woo’ as it sounds, this was one of the hardest things for me to deal with and it still challenges me every day. Having said that, getting honest with yourself in CFS is one of the most liberating stages on your journey.

TypographicFolio-14

Picture taken from here

I’ve always been incredibly independent, fiercely and stubbornly so, so having to move back in with my parents when I was 18 after my diagnosis was beyond all comprehension at the time. It was embarrassing, irritating and made me feel so small and defeated. My parents are two of the most wonderful people in the world, but taking this huge step was such a blow for me. Being reliant on them was even worse.

When I felt strong enough to go out, or even just go to the supermarket with my parents, I saw it as a huge achievement. I’d made it, there was no going back. I’d get stronger every day and then I’d be back to normal…until I woke up the morning realising that all my energy had been zapped in that one afternoon, leaving me with an empty tank once more. I know you know what I’m talking about- you want to use the slightest amount of energy when you’ve got it, not build up your reserves and take your time. Here is where I had to get really honest with myself. I had to pace it. I had to reserve my energy and work with it. I had to have faith.

This was a very long process. I’ve lost count of the number of times I said I was feeling fine to do something, when in fact I knew I was going to regret it the next day. My body begged me not to bother this time, but just to wait a day or two.

Here’s the thing. You have to honour yourself and be honest with yourself, especially in the early stages of recovery. You owe it to yourself and your life. If you know that saying ‘yes’ to the girly shopping trip (hours of walking  and waiting around, chatting, trying on clothes) will leave you feel wiped out the next day, ask yourself if you should really do it. This doesn’t mean abandoning meeting people all together. Maybe you could meet for a lovely green juice in a cafe in the morning, and then let them get on with it. It’s heartbreaking, I know, but even more heartbreaking is the ultimate realisation that you are not looking after or honouring the most important being in your life. You.

There’ll never be another one. You. Are. Essential. You. Are. Divine.

I still struggle with this today, and have made many mistakes by letting my ego get the better of me. I’ve taken full-time jobs when I knew deep down that I wouldn’t be able to handle it and would barely be able to manage part-time. I’ve come home exhausted and barely able to speak, knowing that I should’ve listened to the warning signs and not gone to meet people after work. These actions were usually generated by what other people might/might not think of me if I did/didn’t do something. Dishonesty is a form of fear, and man, was I frightened. Just remember, the people that matter will only care about you and want what’s best for you.

You have to be honest with yourself so you can be honest with others. 

I’m still working on this, and it’s hard and humiliating, but ultimately humbling. You need to prioritise yourself. I used to be terrible at this, but I’m getting a little better, day by day.

Love your vulnerability. Love being true to yourself. Let everything else fall away.

You.

Love-yourself-first1

Picture taken from here

Love and sincerity,

Katie   x

Jun 122015
 

 

As many of you I’m sure already know, loneliness and isolation form a very large and intimidating part of this illness. You’re spending so many hours a day in your own head, in bed, wondering when it’s all going to be over, and to be honest, a lot of the time, stringing a sentence together to speak to people is impossible. I remember my family thinking that I was being really rude for not speaking if they asked me a question, when actually it got to the point where I just couldn’t be bothered to start talking, because I knew I’d never be able to finish my sentence. The feeling of not being able to speak cohesively was so uncomfortable for me that I just didn’t talk in an effort to push this feeling away. It was demoralising- I felt pathetic. Ultimately, this side of me was completely removed from the person I was once- the bubbly, enthusiastic, talkative bundle of energy who always had time for everything and loved every minute of it.

So, realising when I was starting to get better that all my friends had lost touch and got on with their lives was harrowing. It was a real universal acknowledgment that I needed to stop wallowing and accept the now. It meant that I had to embrace loneliness in Chronic Illness and accept isolation for a little while, pretty much because I had no choice.

SONY DSC

Image taken from here

So, why don’t we like being alone?

We need connection as humans, but especially in this illness. We need to know that there’ll be someone there when we holler, someone at arms reach to catch us, to carry us to the bathroom. We need humans as our safety blankets. We need them to tell us that this is all a bit of nightmare and we’ll wake up soon (even though some of our nearest and dearest do this is rather strange ways!) Even if they don’t speak to us, or even if you don’t want them to speak to you, another person’s presence is angelic, warm and reassuring. A validation that other people still exist and lead normal lives while you’re stuck between four walls.

I remember loving weekends during my illness because everyone was at home- even just hearing sounds of people banging around in the kitchen was reassuring and comforting, knowing that I’d have someone to check in on me.

It’s the ultimate sign that someone else still believes in us, even if we don’t. That someone else still holds that flag for you, even if you’ve lost faith in your life. Having our loved ones interfere, nag and fret over us is an outward sign of care, concern and an overall need to make us better, whatever the costs. When we lose all hope in ourselves, we need others to show us the way and remind us of our brilliance.

But, be careful.

Be very careful in your need just to have ‘someone there’ that you don’t bring the wrong people into your circle, those who rob you of your energy, make you worry and stress even more and who ultimately have no faith in you. This can be hard when it’s your family or people you’ve known for a while, but you have to know that ultimately, their concern comes out of anger, frustration and misunderstandings towards your illness, just as yours does when you question yourself. If someone is really zapping your energy, talk to them about it, about how their words make you feel.

Getting comfortable with being on your own.

I’ve spent so much time on my own as a result of this illness that I’m, as sad as this might sound, my own best friend. What I mean by this is that, even though I now have a fantastic network of friends that I meet with very regularly, I’m very comfortable being on my own and I know myself and my own mind really, really well. I honestly believe that this ability to be on my own and enjoy my own company has carried me through and has kept me strong when I lost all hope during my healing. I listened to my inner voice and it carried me through. You lose the ability to do this when you are around other people, trying to please them, listen to them and fight back with wordless arguments. Fighting loneliness now, however deep and scary that bottomless well is, will mean you’ll be stronger for it later, more independent and more joyful in your future life. Ultimately, you’ll come out of the illness fighting, without a need to cling to others or stay small- being comfortable and confident in your own company will let you do that. If you still feel the need to desperately cling to others and to be around people constantly, know that loneliness, little by little, will make you stronger. It’s only in this space that you can grow into your true ‘you’.

I often think that that’s what this illness is here to show us- that there is strength is following our gut instincts, in listening to your inner guidance and in leading your own life.

alone image Image by Lee Scott taken from Unsplash

So, how can you enjoy time on your own?

  • Try one of these now.
  • Meditate. Meditate like there’s no tomorrow without the fear that someone’ll walk in and brand you a big hippie.
  • If you can, write your thoughts down in a journal. Feel the power of just you, pen and paper and the universe.
  • Read and listen to audiobooks like there’s no tomorrow. Lose yourself in the company of someone else through words. You’ll learn so much about yourself, and for goodness sake, don’t feel guilty. You won’t have this time again and you’ll be glad you had this time for growth and understanding when you’re recovered and running around like a mad thing again.

You are allowed to feel lonely- don’t push it away. You are allowed to feel that nasty, metallic, hollow feeling and really get into it. There is no shame in this. You are allowed to enjoy the company of others and at times it’s essential, but if you have to be on your own, flick into that self-exploration mode and go there. It’s scary and you might no like what you find, but ultimately, that’s your way through.

Love and strength,

Katie     xxx

Apr 132015
 

 

angerImage taken from here

This is a post I never really thought I’d write, but I’ve been called to write it after numerous emails from readers and questions from clients.

“How can I move on to loving and accepting my illness and myself when I’m so angry with my body and for the way things have turned out?”

I hear you. I hear you big time. Anger and CFS have played a huge part in my healing, but I had to admit that I was angry first and foremost (which is often the hardest part).

If there’s anything I’ve learned about myself during this whole process of recovering from CFS, it’s how to manage anger and accept it as a normal part of every life. In my family, as in many families, I was told that anger was a bad thing. You weren’t allowed to be angry and you definitely weren’t allowed to express  your anger. This might be a part of the ‘British stiff upper lip’ character trait, but I know it doesn’t just apply to those from UK. Losing your temper or getting revved up in any kind of way is considered negative, ugly and ultimately is seen to reflect badly on you as a person.

angerArtwork taken from here

So, what do you do? You have 2 choices- 1) Let it out despite what people think or 2) Swallow it and don’t say anything.

Number 2 seems like a fairly easy option- it’s the least offensive and confrontational. But….it’s also the most toxic. Anger, like shame, lingers, creeps and builds up, causing a variety of illness and symptoms within the body if it is not released. For example, I was hospitalised with jaundice after I had Glandular Fever, which in energetic terms, is a clear sign of holding on to anger and feeling resentful.

Of course you’re angry that you got sick, of course there are days when you could scream out loud because you are so angry at the situation you’re in. My advice to you is:

LET IT OUT!

For the sake of your future health and wellbeing, do what you have to do to feel and express you anger. Recognise where in your body you feel the anger and let it pass.

* Hit a pillow

* Write your feelings down on paper, in a journal or a diary

* Stamp your feet

* Shout along to you favourite song

* Exercise if you can

* Tell someone (in a loving way without shouting) how you really feel, whether it’s about them, you or the situation you’re in- be honest

* Let yourself cry (and I mean really cry)

Expressing anger is a loving and non-offensive way for some people can take  a lot of practise, but it is possible, and it is the best thing you can do for your emotional and physical health. Once you realise that anger is just another emotion and has the same weight as happiness, for example, you begin to accept and almost welcome it into your life. It’s an incredible opportunity for growth, self-realisation and most importantly, honesty.

What are you angry about and how can you express it lovingly?

Love and authenticity,

Katie   xx

 

Mar 232015
 

 

This post, ‘How To Stay Present Even When You Feel Like You Can’t’ has been reblogged from my article on MindBodyGreen.

If I had a dollar for every time someone has mentioned Eckhart Tolle’s The Power Of Now recently, I’d be buying every MindBodyGreen reader a big green smoothie with it. So I took the hint and read it. Well … I say that I read it, but it actually took me a few attempts to really appreciate what the amazing Mr. Tolle says.

Why did it take me so long? Because living in the present, or the “now,” is an incredibly foreign concept for many of us. We’re already here, so how can we not be in the now?

How are we supposed to stop and think about exactly what’s happening in this moment? I’ve got so much to do this afternoon. I haven’t cleared out my inbox for weeks. I’m worried about how I’m going to be able squeeze it all in. I should probably stop by the chemist on the way home and pick up some sunscreen … and maybe some extra toothpaste, just in case. I’ll get something for dinner tonight as well. Curry again? But we had that on Sunday. Anyway, I suppose I should probably get this email over with first. God, my job is boring. Right … let’s get on with it.

Sound familiar?

present

Our brains race from one thought to another, and if you analyse them very carefully, only a few of them are actually focused on the present moment. Most of them have either a step in the past or the future.

But moving into the true present is addictive. For me, it feels like falling into some kind of crazy vacuum — you become so sucked into the present that the past and the future become impossible to contemplate. You know this feeling if you’ve ever had it, and it’s completely irresistible and addictive.

So how do you do it? Here are five ways to remain in and love the Now:

1. Realize that the now is all we have.

The past is just a story and the future is a complete mystery. This is it. Now.

2. Realize that you can’t predict anything, even if it makes you feel better.

How many times have you played over possible future scenarios in your head to find there’s no way you could have predicted what was going to happen? You feel silly for even thinking about it. It’s wasted brain energy and time that could be spent really listening to people, looking at nature and feeling totally and completely fine with yourself.

3. Meditation, meditation, meditation, practicing mediation, more meditation.

If all else fails, take five big, deep breaths.

4. Accept your thoughts and tendencies and work with them.

Are you a past-focused person or a future-focused person? I’m a future person for sure. If you tend to live in the past, know that you did exactly what you could with the knowledge you had at the time. Write down all your feelings about the event that triggered your thoughts. If you’re a future person, write down why a certain event or person is worrying you and read it over. Do you really, genuinely have cause to be anxious? If you do, act on it. If you don’t, let it go.

5. Follow your passion.

There’s nothing better than that feeling of being completely engrossed in what you’re doing. That, my friends, is the now. That’s why what you’re doing feels so good. Make time for your hobbies and passions — write them in your diary and make sure you feed your soul with them. Recognise the feeling of complete presence as you do it and learn to incorporate that feeling more and more into your every day life.

If you still need more inspiration, let me encourage you to think about this quotation from Eckhart Tolle himself — in the present of course:

“Nothing has happened in the past; it happened in the Now. Nothing will ever happen in the future; it will happen in the Now.”

Love, Katie    xxx

Feb 272015
 

First, let’s start with a confession…well, it’s not really a confession. The thing is, I’m not a great cook- never have been. I used to hate Home Ec classes at school, much to the despair of my Mum and Grandmother who are amazing cooks. I’m a ‘follow the recipe’ kind person and I never really focussed on getting nutrients from my food. However, all this changed for the better when I started changing my diet and realised just how creative you could get in the kitchen, and most of the time, what I make turns out ok!

Let me just say that I know cooking, even eating sometimes, is really difficult with CFS. My diet after I returned to Uni, and probably for a lot of time during it, was embarrassingly awful. Anything that was quick and easy was always in my mind’s eye. My diet during Uni mainly consisted of toast and cereal. Yep, there we have it- quick, easy and absolutely zero nutrients. When I went into my last year a group of friends and I made a big deal of having two nice lunches a week, just to keep ourselves sane and have a chat more than anything. But I realised that nutrition and enjoying your food really does make a huge impact on your energy levels and can really help you without you having to really think about it.

Here are some great recipes you can make, or have someone else make, along with a few easy ways to get nutrients into your diet (and no, they’re not all veggie/vegan!):

1) Juices and smoothies

These are everyday essential for me. I usually have a smoothie for breakfast and a juice as a ‘snack’ in the afternoon- more recipes here! Adding spirulina gives them an extra nutritional kick.

juice

2) Soup

I absolutely love eating soup, I could eat it all day- so I’ve become pretty good at making it (if I do say so myself!)! This is great way to use up leftover veggies you have and to pack as many nutrients into a meal (an easily digestible meal) as possible. Two of my favourites include:

* Broccoli soup from Lee at the amazing Supercharged Food website- it sounds disgusting, but I started making it  in batches for friends, I got so many requests!

* Vegetable (and chicken) soup with old-school soup mix (full of lentils, legumes and nutrients- it’s too easy!)

Broccoli-Soup

Photo taken from the Supercharged Food website

3) Vegan desserts

Now, before you tell me that you don’t do vegan- try this recipe for Raw Vegan Chocolate Cheesecake, courtesy of The Detoxinista. It will blow your socks off! My other half is in no way vegan and can’t get enough of this. Lots of gorgeous raw nuts, raw cacao (bursting with antioxidants), lemon juice, lots of goodness. Don’t say I didn’t warn you!

SONY DSC

Photo taken from The Detoxinista’s website

4) Herbal Teas

Go for it- camomile, chai, dandelion (a great coffee substitute), rose, green tea (my personal favourite), peppermint, lavender (I know!), liquorice, fennel, nettle, lemongrass- the list goes. I would now much rather have herbal tea than coffee any day. It’s cheaper and you’ll feel more cleansed and lighter in the long run.

tea

Photo taken from here

5) Add flaxseed oil and chia seeds to recipes

Flaxseed oil is my nutritional secret. I put it on salads and take in in capsule form (1000mg a day). This is the supplement that really helped with brainfog and aching joints. Chia seeds also have amazing omegas (good) fatty acids in them which your body needs to work at its optimum level and are amazing for creating lasting energy. See this post by Jess at The Wellness Warrior for more chia seed inspiration.

chia

Photo taken from here

So, there we have it. I’ve just given you a few to start off with, but I just wanted to say again how important good nutrition is while you are recovering. As I mentioned in this article here on MindBodyGreen, junk food is a hell of a lot easier, but the nutrient content is zero. Do what’s right for your body and yourself and think about the nutrients your body needs.

Let me know if you have any more recipes you’d like to share!

Love and more of that Vegan Chocolate Cheesecake please,

Katie      xxx

Feb 142015
 

 

(This was my very, very first blog post- published in February 2013. Bless me!)

Over the years I have developed a love of yoga and feel the benefits straight after class. I’m one of those people who goes to yoga for the spiritual benefits, rather than for getting fit and toned, although those are great reasons too. I particularly love hot yoga, but please be advised, this is not for everyone, especially in the early/transition stages of yoga. I’ve really had to learn to listen to my body and not go crazy doing too many classes at once.

Incorporating yoga and CFS has been a bit of a rough journey for me. At first, I was absolutely delighted to even make it through a class. Then, I would convince myself on the journey home that I would probably get ill in the morning, that I’d put my body under too much pressure. Low and behold  the morning after, I was achey and berating myself for even trying (there’s that mind-body communication again!) I’m currently living in Sydney where everyone gets up really early to go running and surfing, and people are generally super fit and healthy  So, why couldn’t I do more than one yoga class a month?! I’d gone from being happy with one class a month, to beating myself up for not doing 4 classes a week!

The key to yoga is taking to slowly. There’s a bit jump between being bed-ridden and trying to do some ‘easy’ yoga stretches! It’s a lot harder than it looks! Here are a few tips to help you along the way (again, I’m by no means an expert, so please listen to your body and do some further research):

* Investigate studios near your house, so you don’t have to worry about travelling to and from class, or being exhausted after it and having a long commute.

* Research different yoga types- I absolutely love Yin Yoga and could quite happily do every class on the schedule! Yoga Nidra is also very relaxing and focusses a lot on breath work and meditation. Yoga Nidra is thought to aid sleep and actually translates as ‘yogic sleep’.

* Make sure you phone or email a studio you are interested to ask if they feel they can cater to your needs or if there is a specific instructor in mind who could help you.

* Before attending your first class, make sure the instructor knows that you have been ill and are still recovering. Also, be sure to tell them about any muscle pain or difficulties you have. You’re probably not the only one experiencing some form of physical pain or discomfort, so don’t feel that you’re alone in needing adjustments!

* If you are in class and feel the exercises are too difficult, there is no shame is recovering by going into Child’s Pose. This has been one of the biggest challenges for me, as I always want to push myself and seem to compare myself to others quite a lot.

* Make sure you drink lots of water before and after class, and also prepare yourself a lovely nourishing meal afterwards. Many people recommend not eating 2 hours before class, but ask the studio to see what they recommend.

* If in any doubt, check with your doctor before attempting classes and if you don’t feel strong enough, don’t go!

Image found here

Yoga is meant to be relaxing and pleasurable, so remember not to push yourself or put to much pressure on yourself. Classes are supposed to be fun, not torturous!

Namaste!

Love, Katie

Click here for an article on hot yoga and CFS, and here for a little trick that might help you to shift your mindset when you walk into the yoga studio.

Feb 032015
 

 

In true Oprah Super Soul Sunday style, I’ve been thinking a lot recently about change and how far away I am from the vision of my life that I had planned for myself when I was 14. To be honest, I didn’t really know what I’d be doing, but I thank the heavens and cosmos every day that things are the way they are right now, warts and all.

405-teenager-cartoon

Cartoon by Everyday People

If I could go back and share some life lessons with my 14-year-old self anything, they would be-

  1. It’s not going to look you think it will. It’ll be even better.
  2. Trust the process.
  3. Hang on- don’t fall out of the roller-coaster.
  4. If you feel sad because a friend leaves your life, just know that there’s someone beautiful just waiting for you around the corner.
  5. You can’t see this right now, but you’re pretty flippin’ strong. Others will see, but sometimes you won’t- trust them on this.
  6. Don’t compare yourself to others as much as you do right now. We’re all built differently, but it’s not until we get a bit older that we see this as a strength rather than a weakness.
  7. Trust your gut. The more you do, the brighter your intuition burns. It’s your brightest light, my dear.
  8. Keep being independent- that what makes you ‘you’.
  9. Let yourself be fascinated by things that you wouldn’t normally feel fascinated by- keep being curious. Don’t stop yourself from diving in just because you can’t see the bottom.
  10. Your soul-sisters are there just waiting for you with open arms and you won’t have to pretend anymore. Stop putting up the barriers.
  11. Your loved ones love you with everything they have- love looks like different things to different people.
  12. You’re a bit of weirdo and people tell you this is a bad thing, but you’ll flippin’ love it when you’re older.
  13. Let yourself be surprised and enjoy innocence- it keeps things fresh and interesting. It doesn’t have to be so serious all the time.
  14. It’s ok to rest. You need to, for your mind and body, and it’s ok to want to.
  15. You’ve only got one life. Play the game well and bat it out of the field…. every.single.time.

Most importantly…

yourself

How about you my lovelies? What would you go back and tell your 14-year-old self?

Love and teenage kicks,

Katie    xxx

Feb 012015
 

Speaking about Energetic Healing and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome is something which I am really, really passionate about. I love reading about it and researching it. It all started with Caroline Myss’ book, ‘Anatomy of the Spirit: The Seven Stages of Power and Healing’, in which Caroline, a Medical Intuitive and Healing expert, talks about chakras, blocks in our chakras and why some people don’t heal because of this. Chakras are an intricate part of our energy anatomy and need to work together in order for us to have healthy and happy lives. (For more on chakras and what each one means, please see this interactive diagram on Belinda Davidson’s page.) Before you go running and screaming, I was hugely sceptical about it too and had no idea what was going on. I just knew I was intrigued and wanted to know more.

chakra

Picture taken from here

However much I read, however, I knew I could only experience it to know for sure what it was all about and whether it worked for me. I was having terribly stomach trouble at the time, but was eating the same stuff, and I was pretty anxious about something I couldn’t put my finger on. The lady I saw said that my solar plexus chakra was blocked, which would explain my stomach troubles, and my third eye chakra was in overdrive (I’m a very visual person who thinks all the time- well, I was!) After my first treatment, much like the White Light healing sessions, I felt lighter, had next to no physical ailments and the world felt lighter and brighter. The lady I saw warned me not to go too crazy with this new found energy (I think you all know exactly what I’m talking about here!). So, what did I do?! You guessed it! I used up all my energy and was back to square one.

The next time I saw her, I knew I had to be sensible and went straight home afterwards and rested. During my sessions, I also uncovered lots of things I didn’t know about myself. I think I was holding on to a lot of anger from being ill and from my past decisions, which showed up in my liver (I had glandular fever a while ago and had jaundice as a result- something was definitely out of balance with my liver!). I would never consider myself to be an angry person, but our bodies store pent up emotions, and I’m a huge believer in mind-body medicine- that certain attitudes and thoughts can sometimes show up in our bodies as illness. After having a few sessions on my liver, I felt a lot better, even better than after my first session!  After my sessions, I’ve continued to improve- I still have the occasional off-day, but so far, so good!

Sessions usually involve being in a very relaxed state. Sessions vary from person to person, and according to practitioner preferences, but can include meditations, aromatherapy, Reiki and affirmations- going in with an open mind is probably the best way to get the most from a session.

*Please note, as with all my posts, what works for me might not work for you, and I’m just sharing my story. Medical advice should be followed and I’m not claiming that Energy Healing will completely cure you in any way. I just know it’s absolutely fascinating!*

Have you ever tried Energetic Healing or know someone who has? I’d love to hear from you! This is just a brief introductory post, but I’ll be going into more detail soon.

Love and healing,

Katie     xx

Jan 202015
 

That person on the bus that irritates you for no apparent reason. What can you learn from him?

The little girl that has boundless amounts of energy and never stops asking questions. What can you learn from her?

The grumpy guy at work who always seems to be sitting under a cloud. What can you learn from him?

The elderly couple at the end of your road who always link arms and walk arm-in-arm together. What can you learn from them?

Screaming, shouting and hurling insults at your other half. What can you learn from that?

Sitting in quiet contemplation, being alone and only listening to your inner voice. What can you learn from that?

What can you learn from yourself? What can others learn from you? What do you want others to learn from you?

We are all one. We are impatient, we are accountable, we are faithful, we are loving, we are volatile, we are boundless, we are empathy. We are one. We share and reflect the character traits of everyone we meet.

He is your brother. She is your sister.

We are vessels for emotion- energy in motion.

please take responsiblity

Taken from Dr. Jill Bolte Taylor

Be patient with others today. How would you like to be treated? Think of this going forward in the way you treat others.

We are one.

we_are_one_by_kimera_kimera-d3adui1

Taken from here

Love and unity,

Katie

Jan 202015
 

travel far

Taken from here with gratitude

Don’t look back- you’ve been there done that. It’s boring and unadventurous.

They say that life’s a journey. How can you journey if you’re not moving forward? Standing still gains perspective, but the journey gains inspiration.

Forgive your past wrongs, but also love them unconditionally. They form part of your unique life experience and no-one is a unique and incredible as you. Be grateful.

You’re not going backwards, so don’t look that way.

We have this moment. That’s it. This moment to live in, breathe in, love in. Don’t miss it. Live in it, swim in it, glory in it. It’s yours. It’s ours. Not yesterday, but today.

Love your past.

Love the Now.

Love and presence,

Katie   xxx

Nov 182014
 

Be completely honest with yourself. Forget about CFS for a moment (really!) and just concentrate on you.

What are those big, completely bonkers, unbelievably insane, but juicy goals you have for yourself? (Notice I’m using ‘have’, not ‘had’)

dream

Image taken from here

Do you think that it’s all over because you’re ill? Have you given up on it? If so, why? (Please don’t say, “Because I’ve got CFS”!) Are you letting your illness pull you down?

You rule CFS, CFS does not rule you.

You know this and you’ve known it since the first day you were diagnosed.

What if your big dream and visualising it is the thing that helps you recover? Is it still looking so terrible? Can you see it in your mind’s eye and imagine yourself in that image?

Dream big, dream bold. Be brave, be bold. Be strong, outrageous, honest, loving and brimming full to enthusiasm.

Your dream is here- I can see it. Everyone around you can see it…and it’s yours. 

…But where are you? What’s stopping you?

Step up and take the route to healing by loving your illness. Sign up to my FREE 4Week Transformation Project, starting soon!

You deserve this- the world needs your dream. Pop the bubble of fear.

In love and fearlessness,

Katie   xx

Nov 082014
 

 

Sometimes, I was so determined to beat this terrible illness that all I did was think about it. I would think about it morning, noon and night (when I wasn’t sleeping, that is!)

I know you want to heal now, instantly, and one of the things that’s so difficult to accept with this whole thing is the longevity of it. When is it going to end? How will it end? Will I wake up one morning and suddenly feel instantly better? It used to drive me absolutely crazy.

selfLoveFortune

Photo taken from here

All I ask of you today, is to take this minute, this hour or this day as a day of healing.

Ask yourself, what do I need today to make me feel better and begin to heal CFS? Even if I wake up tomorrow morning and I’m having a bad day, what I can do for myself today that’ll really make me happy and that I’ll remember tomorrow? What does my body need? What does my spirit need? What does your gut tell you? (Don’t ignore it!)

It doesn’t have to cost a lot of money or use up lots of your energy, but taking time out to find the little joys and pleasures in life and acting on these impulses can make the difference between a bad day and great day. Give all your energy to whatever little pleasure you have, and do not feel guilty about it for a second- you deserve this and you are really honouring yourself through it. Be present and enjoy. If you’re eating chocolate for example, think about the texture, colour and smell of it, as well as the taste. You’ll find your enjoyment rockets to a whole new level!

Here are a few suggestions:

If you honour and care for yourself regularly and every day, even in a small way, you will really start to see the benefits. This will set you up to form amazing healing habits for your recovery and beyond.

How would you find pleasure in this second, this minute, this hour or this day? Comment below!

Love and time-out,

Katie    xx